Friday, February 05, 2010

U.S. Embassy Warning Today

The U.S. Embassy sticks out like a concrete thumb in a park-like setting in Palermo, an embarrassment to good taste made necessary by the negativity the U.S. provokes in Latin America. . . and today is apparently a red-letter day for that.

Inside the fortress, you find very helpful people when you need them. If you register with them as a U.S. citizen living in Argentina, they will send you reminders about how to replace passports and get visas. . . and the occasional warning, like the one I am pasting below that just arrived.

Past warnings have warned about swine flu, dengue fever or protesters blocking roads. . . and this one gets closer to home--a demonstration in front of the embassy against the U.S. deployment of troops in Haiti. The prediction
is a modest turnout "that could turn violent." The warnings always add that just in case. Or is it so no one can complain later (as if we could sue for malpractice?).


Gee, where were the demonstrations THANKING the U.S. for being the first and most generous to offer help? Hmmmm...
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This warden message is being issued to alert U.S. citizens that as reported in the local media, there will be a demonstration directed toward the U.S. Embassy at approximately 6:00 pm on Friday, 5 February 2010. The demonstrators plan to voice their objection with U.S. military forces in Haiti.

The demonstration is estimated to be around 200 individuals. Groups expected to participate include: Partido de los Trabajadores, Partido Obrero, Nuevo MAS, Izquierda Socialista, Movimiento Socialista de los Trabajadores, Convergencia de Izquierda, Partido Comunista de los Trabajadores, and Frente Obrero y Socialista.

The demonstration is expected to be of a peaceful nature. Be advised that demonstrations may turn violent at any given moment for myriad reasons.

U.S. citizens may also call the Office of Overseas Citizens Services in the U.S. for the latest travel information. The Office of Overseas Citizens Services can be reached from 8:00 am – 8:00 pm Eastern Daylight Time, M-F, at 1-888-407-4747, or if calling from outside the U.S., at (202)-501-4444. For any emergencies involving American citizens, please contact the American Citizens Services (ACS) Unit of the U.S. Embassy’s Consular Section, located at 4300 Avenida Colombia, 1425 Buenos Aires; telephone+54-11-5777-4354; after hours emergency telephone +54-11-5777-4873; ACS unit fax +54-11-5777-4293; e-mail BuenosAires-ACS@state.gov; web page http://argentina.usembassy.gov/.


Americans living or traveling in Argentina are encouraged to register with the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate through the State Department's travel registration website, https://travelregistration.state.gov/ibrs/ui so that they can obtain updated information on travel and security within Argentina. Americans without internet access may register directly with the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate.

8 comments:

Marc said...

The US was first only by dint of its geographical proximity (one could ask the more pertinent question why was Haiti like a disaster zone BEFORE the earthquake and come back to that same quirk of geography).

Any fair comparison (ie: by person or GDP) has the US behind numerous countries in the 'generosity' race that seems to be so important to your people. Countries as far away as Finland are above the US and they also have the added plus of not having a record of toppling democratically elected regimes abroad!
Prosper!

Gayle said...

Well, I rather like being in race to be generous...rather than in a race to attack. By the way, Marc, I am not in favor of toppling democratically elected regimes and in fact have protested US military interventions. (I am glad to say that I was not jailed or killed for that, as one might have been during the Argentine dirty war.) Admiring a virtue is not the same as admiring the whole kit-and-kaboodle. In fact, I think it is a really good idea to celebrate when a country or individual does something admirable. What have you got against that?

Marc said...

You don't seem to understand, your comment was 'Gee, where were the demonstrations THANKING the U.S. for being the first and most generous to offer help? Hmmmm...'

Your country was not the most generous as I have stated, there has been a huge response all over the world, why do you ask for a special demonstration for your country?

Why wasn't Luxembourg thanked with a demonstration as it was more generous? The question is ridiculous, and of course nobody from Luxembourg would ask it.

It takes a rare breed of jingoism to ask that question but when the subject of that question is the USA, given the history of that nation's intervention in Haiti, it becomes frightening to ponder how thick the cloak of chauvinism of the inquirer.

Gayle said...

If that was really my point, I would accept your lashing, Marc. The demonstrations here are always AGAINST the U.S., never FOR the U.S. I was merely suggesting that it would be nice someday to see the U.S. get credit for something. I will not defend the US's misdeeds, but neither will I accept that it is always in the wrong. I live where people are a lot like you...quick to criticize and slow if ever to applaud. Okay, so the US was not the most generous per capita. Has it ever done anything that merited applause?

Diego said...

The reason why Argentines hate the US so much is jealousy, plain and simple. Argentines resent anyone who they perceive as being superior or more successful than themselves. It doesn't take a genius to realize that. Besides, the US makes the perfect scapegoat for all their problems, they blame the US for almost everything... The Argentine Government is well aware of this situation and knows how to exploit it, blaming the US so that the populace vents all their anger and frustration on the 'evil empire' and gets distracted from the real problems (the government's corruption, mismanagement, etc) I am an Argentine myself and have lived here all my life, I know what i'm talking about...

Gayle said...

Gracias, Diego.
So there, Marc...Diego affirms what I was bemoaning--namely, the undeservedly harsh attitudes towards the US in Argentina, shown by surveys to be the most anti-US country in Latin America. If hatred were really based on misdeeds, as you suggest, why isn't the Catholic Church hated as much here or around the world? (And why don't Chile, Mexico, and Guatemala hate the US more, given the interventions were worse?) Why do you pointedly ignore the geo-political context of my comments in your rush to spout your ideology? And did you remember to contribute to the Haitian disaster? I bet you looked at gov't contributions--take a look at private ones too. I'm sure glad that most folks here are willing to look at me and not judge me by my passport. . . best not to judge a person by what their President or Congress does, as if I had veto power!

Gayle said...

Gracias, Diego.
So there, Marc...Diego affirms what I was bemoaning--namely, the undeservedly harsh attitudes towards the US in Argentina, shown by surveys to be the most anti-US country in Latin America. If hatred were really based on misdeeds, as you suggest, why isn't the Catholic Church hated as much here or around the world? (And why don't Chile, Mexico, and Guatemala hate the US more, given the interventions were worse?) Why do you pointedly ignore the geo-political context of my comments in your rush to spout your ideology? And did you remember to contribute to the Haitian disaster? I bet you looked at gov't contributions--take a look at private ones too. I'm sure glad that most folks here are willing to look at me and not judge me by my passport. . . best not to judge a person by what their President or Congress does, as if I had veto power!

Robearto said...

It is without question that The United States of America has been the most generous nation when it comes to relief in Haiti. Any suggestion otherwise can only render the person suggesting it non-credible and not worth listening to.

My good friend in New York is the son of former Hatian Presdident Jean-Bertrand Aristide. He was the President that Bill Clinton was trying to "Install" in Haiti when he was overthrown by a corrupt military coup.

Bill Clinton was not trying to "Install" Mr. Aristide because he wanted to take advantage of Haiti's limited natural resources, he wanted to "install" Mr. Aristade because Mr. Aristade had already proven himself to be a proven and non-corrupt leader which is what the people of Haiti deserved.

You keep telling yourself that The United States is the big bad wolf, it won't prevent us from continuing to be the glue that prevents this world from melting into total chaos. If the day ever did come when the US decided to stop participating in world safety, you r very life would be in far greater danger than it is now. But you are not willing to accept that; you want to believe that the world would be a better place without US intervention.
You are dead wrong Marc.